A transport service contract is a contract between suppliers of goods and those offering transport for those goods. In such an agreement, the supplier of goods, which is usually a wholesaler or manufacturer, undertakes to pay the carrier to deliver the physical goods to retailers and other distributors. The Contracting Party, which is generally a transport undertaking, a shipping service provider, an airline or a railway line, is obliged to deliver the goods dispatched in good time and on sale. If this is not the case, a violation of the treaty has been committed, with negotiated penalties. Contracts of carriage relate to legally enforceable agreements for the provision of transport services. These contracts can be concluded for a wide range of transport services, from domestic rail freight to engine transport services. The customer pays all transport costs such as toll roads, gympikes or unforeseen road costs. Although a transport service contract varies depending on the needs of entering into a transaction and the conditions of negotiation, most follow a similar format and cover similar basic concepts, including: Here is an example of case law defining the contract of carriage: Almost every company has a relationship with a transport company that is ultimately documented in a formal contract. . . .